How do I know if my construct carries sequences from a plant pest?
Updated October 30, 2013
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The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulates the importation and interstate transport of insects that are plant pests (see Federal Plant Pest Regulations), and the importation of transgenic insects that contain vector or donor sequences from a plant pest or an unclassified organism (see Federal Genetically-Engineered Plant Pest Regulations).

A list of plant pest species is given inFederal Genetically-Engineered Plant Pest Regulation. A few organisms have been added to this list since the regulations were written, but it’s unlikely the pest status has changed for any organism the typical fly geneticist might be interested in. If you have questions about the pest status of a species, you may contact Biotechnology Regulatory Services.

Only a small number of species have donated sequences to existing Drosophila constructs. We have classified these donor species below. Many of these species have donated epitope tags, not full-length genes.

Note that no vertebrate is considered a plant pest. Drosophila suzukii is the only Drosophila species classified as a plant pest.
Species name
Common name
Plant pest?
Acanthokara kaputensis
Velvet worm/Onychophoran
No
Adenovirus, Human type 5
No
Aedes aegypti
Mosquito
No
Armoracia rusticana
Horseradish
No
Anopheles gambiae
Mosquito
No
Antheraea pernyi
Silk moth
Yes
Apis mellifera
Honeybee
No
Aequorea victoria
Jellyfish
No
Arabidopsis thaliana
Cress
No
Artemia spp.
Brine shrimp
No
Avian leukemia virus
No, but see note below
Avian retrovirus MH2
No, but see note below
Bacillus halodurans
No
Bombyx mori
Silk moth
Yes
Bradysia hygida
Sciarid fly
Yes
Caenorhabditis elegans
Roundworm
No
Calliphora vicina
Blowfly
No
Ceratitis capitata
Medfly
Yes
Chironomus spp.
Midge
No
Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Unicellular Algae
No
Clostridium tetani
Tetanus
No, but see note below
Corynebacterium diphtheriae
Diphtheria
No
Discosoma sp.
Sea anemone
No
Drosophila species
Pomace flies
No, except D. suzukii
Drosophila suzukii
Spotted-wing Drosophila
Yes
Epstein Barr virus
No
Escherichia coli
E. coli
No
Flavobacterium sp.
No
Haemotobia irritans
Hornfly
No
Halocynthia roretzi
Sea squirt
No
Heliothis virescens
Tobacco budworm
Yes
Helobdella robusta
Leech
No
Herpes simplex virus
No
Hirudo medicinalis
Leech
No
HIV
Human immunodeficiency virus
No
Hordeum vulgare
Barley
No
Hyalophora cecropia
Cecropia moh
Yes
Hydra vulgaris
Hydra
No
Influenza virus
Flu
No
Lambda
Lambda phage
No
Locusta migratoria
Grasshopper
Yes
Lucerne transient streak virus
Yes
M13
Bacteriophage M13
No
Manduca sexta
Tobacco hornworm
Yes
Megaselia scalaris
Phorid fly
No
Musca domestica
Housefly
No
Oncopeltus fasciatus
Milkweed bug
Yes
P1
Bacteriophage P1
No
Photinus pyralis
Firefly
No
Polyoma virus
No
Pseudomonas diminuta
No
Renilla reniformis
Sea pansy
No
Ricinus communis
Castor bean
No, but see note below
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Budding yeast
No
Sarcophaga peregrina
Flesh fly
No
Schistocerca americana
Grasshopper
Yes
Schistosoma japonicum
Bladder fluke
No
Schizosaccharomyces pombe
Fission yeast
No
Sciara coprophila
Fungus fly
Yes
SV40
Simian virus 40
No
SV5
Simian virus 5
No
T7
Bacteriophage T7
No
Tenebrio molitor
Meal worm
Yes
Tribolium castaneum
Flour beetle
Yes
Trichoplusia ni
Cabbage looper moth
Yes
Vesicular Stomatitis Virus
No, but see note below
Zaprionus indianus
Yes
Castor Bean (Ricinus communis) is not a plant pest, but one of the only Select Agent gene sequence that is commonly used in Drosophila transgenic constructs is the Castor Bean Ricin A chain gene. There are special regulations concerning the importation and possession of Select Agents that you should be familiar with before bringing these biological reagents into your lab.
Cabbage Looper Moth (Trichoplusia ni) is a plant pest. The piggyBac transformation system was derived from Trichoplusia, so piggyBac inverted repeats and transposase sequences fall under USDA regulations concerning the importation of plant pest sequences. Consequently, permits for importing piggyBac constructs must be obtained by completing the e-permits application as described in Applying for permits to import flies carrying transgenic constructs with sequences from plant pests
Transgenic strains carrying sequences from animal pathogens such as Clostridium and animal viruses may require additional import permits. We advise you to contact Biotechnology Regulatory Services with questions about permit requirements for importing such fly strains.